One in every ten children is dyslexic and many more struggle with reading and writing. Early intervention and a structured multi-sensory teaching programme can make all the difference. As a qualified teacher and member of the British Dyslexia Association, I have taught countless children to read and will help your child to become a confident and competent reader as well as helping them find ways to improve their writing and spelling.

Contact me today to find out how I can help you and your child.

Friday, 16 March 2018

Who is responsible for educating your child?

Who is responsible for educating your child? If you home educate then you will know that the responsibility for ensuring your child receives a 'suitable' education lies entirely with you. But what if you send your child to school? Doesn't your responsibility end at the school gate? 

Well, no it doesn't. All parents with children at school are used to supporting them with their homework, listening to them read and doing what we can outside of school to complement their education. We may make trips to museums or buy them books but we largely rely on schools to educate our children. 


Don't get me wrong, schools do have a responsibility to ensure that they provide a broad and inclusive curriculum suited to each child's individual needs. But, and I'm going to get technical here, according to Section 7 of the Education Act 1996, it is the duty of parents to to ensure that their child receives a 'suitable education' for them.

A big part of this duty can be met by sending your child to school but if they have additional learning needs, for example, dyslexia, that the school is failing to adequately address then it is up to you as a parent, to ensure these needs are met.

This may sound daunting but in truth, the legislation is to your benefit - particularly if you find yourself at loggerheads with the school over how to meet your child's needs.

Many schools are strapped for cash. Even those that aren't find that the LEA places constraints on them that limit their ability to help children with special or additional learning needs. 

However, knowing that you as a parent have to ensure that they get adequate help means that if you need to take your child out of school to receive specialist support then the law is on your side.

If you feel your child needs additional support that the school aren't providing, then seek out a private specialist teacher. Then approach the school and tell them that you intend to take your child out for regular lessons to get additional support and ask when would be the best time. Some schools will work with you on this without further explanation or discussion.

If the school are resistant, try not to be confrontational - even if you think the school has let your child down. Explain that you appreciate that they have budget constraints but are doing their best to support your child. Explain that you have a duty to ensure that your child's needs are met - quote the Education Act if you feel it will help. Present the use of a specialist teacher as a positive - for the school as well as your child; your child will do better. This in turn will improve the school's overall results as well.

I provide a letter for parents to take into school, which helps.The key thing is to get your child the help that they need as soon as you can - wherever you can. Don't let anyone stand in your way.

If your child is struggling then contact me today to get them the help and support they need to succeed. Screening and tuition available now.



No comments:

Post a Comment