One in every ten children is dyslexic and many more struggle with reading and writing. Early intervention and a structured multi-sensory teaching programme can make all the difference. As a qualified teacher and member of the British Dyslexia Association, I have taught countless children to read and will help your child to become a confident and competent reader as well as helping them find ways to improve their writing and spelling.

Contact me today to find out how I can help you and your child.

Tuesday, 8 January 2019

When the numbers don't add up.

Does your child struggle with maths? No matter how often you teach them the 'basics', does nothing seem to sink in? Is it like they just don't understand numbers? At all? They may well be dyscalculic but a recent study suggests that it is unlikely that anyone at school has noticed. 

According to a study by Queen's University Belfast, a child with dyscalculia, also known as a specific learning difficulty in maths, is 100 times less likely to get their dycalculia recognised than a dyslexic child. 

Parents who have struggled to get their child's dyslexia recognised will appreciate just how significant this is! Sadly, without recognition, children with dyscalculia are unlikely to receive the support they need in school and they need extra support if they are to master numeracy.

The findings may come as no surprise to the many parents struggling to get schools to take their child's persistent difficulties in maths seriously. There appears to be a tacit acceptance in education that some people just 'can't do maths'. Of course, schools vary and for every school that says 'we don't do dyscalculia here' and 'she'll get it in the end', there are schools trying really hard to help those struggling with maths to master the subject. 



So why the startling statistic? Well, in my experience, the biggest problem that children with dyscalculia face is that teachers, in general, lack awareness and training. Dyscalculia isn't just finding maths difficult or being a bit slow to grasp mathematical concepts. It is a lack of understanding of numbers.Teachers will use all the strategies that they have learnt to help children make progress in maths but children with dyscalculia need specialist support. More of the same simply won't work.

Also, for most teachers, dyscalculia simply isn't on their radar so they don't suspect it and therefore don't screen and school educational psychologists don't assess.

But what if you suspect your child is dyscalculic? What can you do? 

  1. Raise your concerns with the class teacher and ALN (Additional Learning Needs) Co-ordinator. Ask if they can screen your child to see if they have any of the signs of dyscalculia.
  2. If they are not willing to screen then seek out a specialist tutor - they should be able to carry out a screening to assess your child's ability. A screening will ascertain the likelihood that your child's maths difficulties are related to dyscalculia. Costs will vary but should be less than £150.
  3. Take the results back to the school. As with dyslexia screenings, I find that if parents take the results into the school, it helps to galvanise the school into action; many schools want to help but, when it comes to dyscalculia, they simply don't know how. A screening report should provide teachers and parents with practical suggestions to support your child.
  4. Ask the school to tell you how they're going to address your child's needs. What adjustments are they going to make for your child in the classroom and how are they going to provide suitable activities to help them develop their mathematical skills?
  5. Schools have limited resources. If you feel that your school isn't able to provide adequately for your child then consider arranging additional lessons with a specialist tutor. 
  6. You might also want to consider a formal dyscalculia assessment. This needs to be done by an Educational Psychologist and will cost around £700.
There are a number of things you can do at home - which I'll cover another time- but essentially, dyscalculia, like dyslexia, does not go away. However, with the right help and support your child can master the basic skills necessary to do maths.

I screen children for dyscalculia from six years and up and, as with the dyslexia screening, many children are genuinely pleased to discover a reason behind their difficulties. As one child said to me: "I'm not stupid after all". No, not stupid at all. 

If your child is struggling then contact me today to get them the help and support they need to succeed. Screening and tuition for dyscalculia and dyslexia available now.