One in every ten children is dyslexic and many more struggle with reading and writing. Early intervention and a structured multi-sensory teaching programme can make all the difference. As a qualified teacher and member of the British Dyslexia Association, I have taught countless children to read and will help your child to become a confident and competent reader as well as helping them find ways to improve their writing and spelling.

Contact me today to find out how I can help you and your child.

Tuesday, 22 January 2019

Tackling Times Tables

Did you ever have that sinking feeling when a teacher asked you a times table question? I remember being rooted to the spot and feeling sick at the prospect of being asked what six times eight was or eight times nine.

For most of the children that I teach, times tables have been a massive problem. Many dyslexics, though by no means all, struggle with numbers too and most have poor working memory which means that learning sequences, such as the number patterns found in times tables, is tricky.


So, what can you do to help them? Well, I think it is important to explain to children why you are asking them to do something - they're far more likely to join in if they know that there is a good reason to do so! In a nutshell, knowing your times tables makes life easier; once you know them, you can count things more quickly e.g count sweets in 2s or 4s or count out money in 5s and 10s - which then gives you more time to do other things. Also, once you know your times tables, you can do division more quickly and easily.

Now comes the practical bit. How can you make times tables stick? First, times table songs are great - there are loads on You Tube and watching a video helps many dyslexics, who tend to think visually, to connect the numbers with pictures, which makes the information more memorable.

Essentially, if you want to teach a child, particularly one with specific learning difficulties like dyslexia or dyscalculia, something that they find hard or are unwilling to tackle, you need to make it interesting.

I recently developed this game which is fast becoming a firm favourite amongst my pupils. It is easy to replicate at home, doesn't take long and can be adapted to suit each individual.

I call it Footstep Tables.

You will need:

Paper
Scissors
1 pair feet
Pens
Dice (2 ordinary or one 12 sided)


  • Start by drawing around your child's feet then cut out 12 footprints. 
  • Write one answer to the times table you are practising e.g two times table, on each footprint.
  • Arrange the footprints in sequence order on the floor.
  • Take turns to throw the dice then step on the footprint that shows that multiple and say the sum e.g throw a 5, step on 10 and say 5 times 2 equals 10.
  • The first person to throw a 12 and jump on the right footprint is the winner.


There are variations; if jumping is something your child enjoys then you can spread the footprints out a bit and make jumping successfully from one to another part of the game.

As your child becomes more competent, you can mix the footprints up so that the times table is no longer set out in sequence.

If your child enjoys a puzzle, then ditch the dice and have clue cards e.g this number comes next after 6 (in the two times table).

Always get them to say the sum as they jump onto the number as this reinforces the connection between the two.

Playing this game often, say, once or twice a day, will make a real difference and it makes a change from sitting still.

Have fun and let me know how you get on!

Remember, if your child is struggling then contact me today to get them the help and support they need to succeed. Screening and tuition for dyscalculia and dyslexia available now.


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